6/11/14

Cinema Citing: Stardust

  
      Stardust with its flying boats, lightning in boxes, and glowing human stars engages the imagination in high adventure.
       Dwelling in a small village, in quaint England, is a father and son. Tristan, the son played by Charlie Cox, is infatuated with a neighborhood girl, despite her selfishness and snobbery. On the eve of her birthday, the two  witness a falling star, which Tristan vows to fetch for her. He ventures over the mysterious, barrier wall into the unknown land beyond. Thus begins Tristan's journey to discover the talking star, his lost mother, and his hidden lineage. 
    Tristan, through his travels in the world of witches and ghosts and magic, finds his truer love and his truer identity. When he happens upon the star, he discovers a woman instead of a glowing meteorite. On the way home, he falls onto the ship of a ferocious Captain Shakespeare, who turns out to be a kindly gay front man for the faux-fierce lightning-catching crew. Towards the end of his trials, Tristan battles ragged witches, who are seeking to gain youth by ripping out the heart of the star. Tristan returns to his village a valiant and discerning hero.
      Robert De Niro, Claire Danes, Mark Strong, and Ian McClellan fire up every role, from the bratty, fratricidal princes who end up as ghosts to the vain, vivacious witch who drives a goat drawn cart.  Although the complexity of the plot-lines confuse at first, they are essential to weaving the rich tapestry in which the narrative is set. 
     Due to several graphic scenes of animals being gutted and men being killed in disturbing ways the film should not be viewed by young eyes. Nevertheless, it is a satisfying romance and an entertaining adventure story.

Veronica A.

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